November 27, 2014

1st Annual College Football Bowl Pick ‘Em Contest

(Submissions will be accepted on a rolling basis and will be scored from the date stamp forward.)

I am starting a college football bowl pick ‘em contest here on NOVA Common Sense. This is similar to the NCAA Tournament brackets done for college basketball on other blogs/newspapers and at water coolers all across working America. The difference here is that this contest deals with college football which automatically makes it better. I am biased. I lettered in varsity football in college.

Here are the rules.
– Pick one winner for each game. We will not complicate matters with a spread. Just pick the winner of each game.
– You earn one point for each correct prediction.
– You earn three points for each correct BCS Bowl prediction. BCS bowls are the Fiesta, Orange, Rose, and Sugar Bowls.
– You earn five points for picking the winner of the BCS Championship Game between #1 LSU and #2 Alabama.

Bonus points for the football-challenged and for the George Allen/Jack Kemp/Heath Shuler/J.C. Watts/Steve Largent wannabes:
– You earn five points for picking the winner of the Iowa caucuses set to take place on January 3, 2012 and five points for the winner of the New Hampshire primary on January 10, 2012. Pick who you think will win. This person may not necessarily be who you want to win and your choice here does not constitute your endorsement in any way, shape, or form.

This is just for fun. Competition is its own reward.

My picks are listed below in bold. The form to enter your picks follows.

O let’s do it.

Bowl Location Date/Time Network
Gildan New Mexico
Temple vs. Wyoming
Albuquerque, N.M.
University Stadium
Tickets
Dec. 17
2 p.m.
ESPN
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
Ohio vs. Utah State
Boise, Idaho
Bronco Stadium
Tickets
Dec. 17
5:30 p.m.
ESPN
R+L Carriers New Orleans
San Diego State vs. Louisiana-Lafayette
New Orleans
Mercedes-Benz Superdome
Tickets
Dec. 17
9 p.m.
ESPN
Beef ‘O’ Brady’s St. Petersburg
Florida International vs. Marshall
St. Petersburg, Fla.
Tropicana Field
Tickets
Dec. 20
8 p.m.
ESPN
S.D. County Credit Union Poinsettia
TCU vs. Louisiana Tech
San Diego
Qualcomm Stadium
Tickets
Dec. 21
8 p.m.
ESPN
MAACO Las Vegas
Arizona State vs. Boise State
Las Vegas
Sam Boyd Stadium
Tickets
Dec. 22
8 p.m.
ESPN
Sheraton Hawaii
Nevada vs. Southern Miss
Honolulu
Aloha Stadium
Tickets
Dec. 24
8 p.m.
ESPN
AdvoCare V100 Independence
Missouri vs. North Carolina
Shreveport, La.
Independence Stadium
Tickets
Dec. 26
5 p.m.
ESPN2
Little Caesars
Western Michigan vs. Purdue
Detroit
Ford Field
Tickets
Dec. 27
4:30 p.m.
ESPN
Belk
Louisville vs. NC State
Charlotte, N.C.
Bank of America Stadium
Tickets
Dec. 27
8 p.m.
ESPN
Military Bowl Presented By Northrop Grumman
Toledo vs. Air Force
Washington, D.C.
RFK Stadium
Tickets
Dec. 28
4:30 p.m.
ESPN
Bridgepoint Education Holiday
California vs. Texas
San Diego
Qualcomm Stadium
Tickets
Dec. 28
8 p.m.
ESPN
Champs Sports
Florida State vs. Notre Dame
Orlando, Fla.
Florida Citrus Bowl
Tickets
Dec. 29
5:30 p.m.
ESPN
Valero Alamo
Washington vs. Baylor
San Antonio
Alamodome
Tickets
Dec. 29
9 p.m.
ESPN
Bell Helicopter Armed Forces
BYU vs. Tulsa
Dallas
Gerald J. Ford Stadium
Tickets
Dec. 30
Noon
ESPN
New Era Pinstripe
Rutgers vs. Iowa State
Bronx, N.Y.
Yankee Stadium
Tickets
Dec. 30
3:20 p.m.
ESPN
Franklin American Mortgage Music City
Mississippi State vs. Wake Forest
Nashville, Tenn.
LP Field
Tickets
Dec. 30
6:40 p.m.
ESPN
Insight
Iowa vs. Oklahoma
Tempe, Ariz.
Sun Devil Stadium
Tickets
Dec. 30
10 p.m.
ESPN
Meineke Car Care of Texas
Texas A&M vs. Northwestern
Houston
Reliant Stadium
Tickets
Dec. 31
Noon
ESPN
Hyundai Sun
Georgia Tech vs. Utah
El Paso, Texas
Sun Bowl
Tickets
Dec. 31
2 p.m.
CBS
AutoZone Liberty
Cincinnati vs. Vanderbilt
Memphis, Tenn.
Liberty Bowl
Tickets
Dec. 31
3:30 p.m.
ABC
Kraft Fight Hunger
Illinois vs. UCLA
San Francisco
AT&T Park
Tickets
Dec. 31
3:30 p.m.
ESPN
Chick-fil-A
Virginia vs. Auburn
Atlanta
Georgia Dome
Tickets
Dec. 31
7:30 p.m.
ESPN
TicketCity 
Houston vs. Penn State
Dallas
Cotton Bowl
Tickets
Jan. 2
Noon
ESPNU
Outback
Michigan State vs. Georgia
Tampa, Fla.
Raymond James Stadium
Tickets
Jan. 2
1 p.m.
ABC
Capital One
Nebraska vs. South Carolina
Orlando, Fla.
Florida Citrus Bowl
Tickets
Jan. 2
1 p.m.
ESPN
Taxslayer.com Gator Bowl
Ohio State vs. Florida
Jacksonville, Fla.
EverBank Field
Tickets
Jan. 2
1 p.m.
ESPN2
Rose Bowl Game presented by Vizio
Wisconsin vs. Oregon
Pasadena, Calif.
Rose Bowl
Tickets
Jan. 2
5 p.m.
ESPN
Tostitos Fiesta
Stanford vs. Oklahoma State
Glendale, Ariz.
U. of Phoenix Stadium
Tickets
Jan. 2
8:30 p.m.
ESPN
Allstate Sugar
Michigan vs. Virginia Tech
New Orleans
Louisiana Superdome
Tickets
Jan. 3
8:30 p.m.
ESPN
Discover Orange
West Virginia vs. Clemson
Miami
Sun Life Stadium
Tickets
Jan. 4
8:30 p.m.
ESPN
AT&T Cotton
Kansas State vs. Arkansas
Arlington, Texas
Cowboys Stadium
Tickets
Jan. 6
8 p.m.
FOX
BBVA Compass Bowl
SMU vs. Pittsburgh
Birmingham, Ala.
Legion Field
Tickets
Jan. 7
1 p.m.
ESPN
GoDaddy.com
Arkansas State vs. Northern Illinois
Mobile, Ala.
Ladd-Peebles Stadium
Tickets
Jan. 8
9 p.m.
ESPN
Allstate BCS National Championship Game
No. 1 LSU vs. No. 2 Alabama
New Orleans
Louisiana Superdome
Tickets
Jan. 9
8:30 p.m.
ESPN

Iowa: Newt Gingrich
New Hampshire: Newt Gingrich

Changes coming to NoVA Common Sense

It’s been a little short of two years since I started Common Sense back in June of 2010.  We went from a start-up blog written by me alone to a solid fixture in the Northern Virginia political landscape, and we’re routinely ranked in the top 25 conservative blogs in Virginia. We’ve been linked to and quoted by multiple news outlets, from NBC4 to the Washington Post, and in the short time we’ve been around, we’ve received 124,000 visits and over 240,000 page views.

When I decided to run for office, I expected that things would change, but I told myself that I would still do my best to continue to present my opinion and my analysis in the same thoughtful, even-handed way that I had been since I started blogging.  Unfortunately, I’ve found that I can’t do that. While I began my campaign as a blogger, I ended it as a former candidate. I can’t go back to just being a blogger, even though I want to, because public perception of me has altered.

And because of that change, I recognized that I couldn’t maintain Common Sense on my own. I can’t provide the kinds of insight or news on local Republican issues because no one treats me as just a blogger anymore. And, unlike Ben Tribbett, Lowell or others, I’m not going to publicly attack members of my own party, even if I disagree with what they may be doing. One of the character traits that defines me is loyalty, and I would rather work to change things I don’t like from the inside, rather than take potshots from the outside. I’ve found I can be more effective that way.

So instead of hanging around at Common Sense, writing a bunch of boring, bland posts that don’t step on anyone’s toes, I decided to take a step back and hand the reins of the site over to someone else.

During the campaign season, I relied heavily on Phil Tran to keep the site going and provide us with the content that I couldn’t post. He was the one contributor that I could rely on the most to get new content on the site consistently during the campaign season.  So when I decided to step back from Common Sense, he was the logical person to turn to.  Phil has graciously agreed to take over editorial control on the site, and I’m sure that he’ll keep things running well.  He has my full confidence.

As many of you know, I’m also a contributor over at Bearing Drift.  Bearing Drift has been working to expand its reach to cover all areas of the Commonwealth, and we’ve branched out from just a website to include a print magazine and a radio show that’s syndicated around Virginia.  In order to handle the increased revenue and increased responsibility having multiple formats created, Jim Hoeft, Bearing Drift’s owner and publisher, merged the site in with Virginia Line Media, LLC.  When that was done, he asked me, along with Shaun Kenney, Norm Leahy and Scott Lee, to join him on the Board of Directors.  In addition, I was named General Counsel for Virginia Line Media as well.  So while you may not be seeing me in print over here at Common Sense, you’ll still get my views and commentary – usually over statewide and national issues rather than Northern Virginia focused – over at Bearing Drift.  I invite you all to come over and visit with us.

I want to thank all of our readers and fans for their support over the last year and a half, and I hope you had as much fun reading what we’ve written as I did publishing it. Come visit me over on Bearing Drift and I hope you enjoy Phil Tran’s Common Sense as much as you enjoyed mine!

Army-Navy Preview

Starting today, I will, from time to time, publish sports articles of regional interest. Football is my first love and I lettered in the sport in college as a running back on the Baylor Bears football team (Currently #12 in the nation, invited to the Alamo Bowl, and quarterback Robert Griffin III “RG3″ is a Heisman Trophy finalist.). Every once in a while, I would like to write about topics I really like in which I am well-versed. I do not think about politics 24/7 and I hate it 12/7. Unlike virtually all other politicos, I am shockingly normal.


Thanks to a connection to West Point, I have the privilege of attending the Army-Navy Game today at FedEx Field. Kickoff is at 2:30pm. In my book, this means I must report to the stadium by 12:30pm. I have always wanted to attend the Army-Navy Game in person and this will be my first time!

I don’t tailgate. I don’t even know what tailgating is since I spent my entire life warming-up on the field and getting focused in the locker room during pre-game! I like to go to the game early, get my mind right, and watch the pre-game warm-ups to scout the participants. I’ll be the only person in my group of 24 friends who received tickets from our mutual West Point alumnus and faculty member to show up at the stadium first and all alone to witness everything from the start of pre-game warm-ups.

Especially for the Army-Navy Game, I would strongly discourage everybody from wasting time with tailgates and other non-football tomfoolery. Aside from getting to see which team is more focused and crisp in their pitch relationship for their triple option attack during pre-game, the entrance procession of the Cadets and Midshipmen is quite a sight to see and the pre-game ceremonies will provoke intense pride in our great nation.

Our block of reserved group seating is in the lower level. The vast majority of fans would be excited to see the action up close. I actually like to sit up high so I can get my offensive coordinator mind on. Yes, it really does matter to me that I discern if the defense is playing cover 2 or cover 3 and I can only make that determination with a bird’s eye view. A suite would be perfect. (Football elitist alert!)

With the exception of siding with my favorite players, I hardly ever root for any team while watching football. I’ll watch football just for the sake of watching football. Two unknown Division III colleges could be playing and it would still pique my interest. I’m a student of the game (nerd) and I watch the game in thoughtful silence. (NOVA Common Sense founder Brian Schoeneman knows this all to well.)

This could be the year Army (3-8) snaps its losing streak to Navy (4-7). Navy is experiencing a down year. The turning point of Navy’s season was its heartbreaking overtime loss to Air Force after coming back from a large deficit to tie the game in the final minute. Navy’s uncharacteristic season has been characteristic of a team that has unfulfilled potential due to close losses and an inability to put together a complete game on offense, defense, and special teams.

Army enters the game with the #1 ranked rushing offense in the nation. This should be qualified with the fact that Army’s passing offense is ranked #120. Navy’s rushing offense is ranked #4 and its passing offense is ranked #119. As always, the Army-Navy Game will be an old school matchup fought and won in the trenches.

After making their first bowl appearance since 1996 in 2010, Army has failed to become bowl eligible this season. Injuries and a difficult schedule made the task of earning a bowl bid challenging. Navy is favored to win by seven points.

Army-Navy is the best college football rivalry. The tradition and pageantry surrounding this event has no equivalent. Fierce competition on the field ends with brothers in arms united, standing in attention for each team’s school song.

Seniors leave the game understanding that they will join with their West Point and Annapolis brethren and spend the next few years of their lives defending freedom in an always hostile world. Some of these players have the talent to go pro, but they all knew coming in that when they play football for a service academy, they are representing a greater cause and aspirations of going pro must wait until they fulfill their commitment to serve. It is moving, especially when you know what it is like to play football at the college level, to see these seniors play the final regular season game of their collegiate career with unbridled passion and leave every last bit of their soul out on the field to the point of tears.

I like to have it both ways. I also like to make fashion statements and color coordinate my outfits in the freshest manner. My closet is filled with hats of many different teams, some of which I have a passing interest and others were needed to fill a gap in a color scheme in my wardrobe. I have Washington Redskins hats AND Dallas Cowboys hats. That said…

Go Army. Go Navy.

Happy Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving.
Football.
Snow.

Enjoy.

It’s Election Day! Go vote!

It’s November 8 – Election Day.  Please take a minute out of your busy schedules to go vote!

Polls are officially open right now and will be open until 7 PM today.

To find your local polling location, please visit the Virginia State Board of elections.  If you’re looking for Republican candidates for office, please visit the Fairfax County Republican Committee website.

All of my campaign’s internal numbers indicate that this election will have near record low voter turnout. This means every vote matters even more than usual and your vote means significantly more than it will next year in the Presidential race.  All of our Republican candidates need your help, including me.  Get out there and vote!

Do your part – vote on November 8th

As we come down to the last few days before the election, I paused to reflect on, and decided to share a recent experience as I walked with a candidate. We came across a woman who claimed that she does not vote. In a long ago conversation she told me that she was registered to vote, and as is typical of many families, she was the person that kept up on current events. She felt she had to be for the good of her children in the school system.

I suspect that she claimed not to vote because I was walking with a stranger. This reaction is typical of many that are immigrants and have experienced oppression and intimidation in their homelands prior to living in the U S. Most Americans take for granted that this is the land of the free and the home of the brave. So much so that they feel that can never change and miss the many ways that liberty and rights have been eroded, nor do they know how to stand up to defend and fight for those rights. Most immigrants accept the good and even when they recognize something wrong feel it was bound to happen here sooner or later and simply withdraw and take defensive measures.

Cringing weakens the moral fabric, pride and strength of what it means to be American. It is possible to have the pride and maintain the rights without ever becoming arrogant. I have become a Tea Party supporter because they have not been making trouble, but been busy educating and empowering through promoting general knowledge of current events and of the United States Constitution. There is nothing coercive about their gatherings, and discussions cover a wide range of topics and include people with origins in many countries and ethnic groups and across economic lines.

The group is known mainly to be anti-tax but there is so much more to what they stand for. Tea Party members have been getting a bad name but their arguments make sense. The aim is to handle available funds and spending efficiently. If a family has the disposable income to buy a RV or boat which they use once a year. They can have parties every weekend with top brand liquors, prime rib and lobster. This family could not expect someone else to always foot the bill for this lifestyle. Failing to reign in spending with a government is similar in extravagance. Taxes keep increasing to cover the cost of the expanding budget which deprives modest families of the means to plan their lives. Taking extra from someone who has worked hard to earn more is not the best method to solve the problem. Government spending and tax hikes need to be limited in favor of increased efficiency and accountability.

Republicans believe in empowerment and individual achievement as the way to prosperity and well-being, with no limit on what can be achieved. Government measures for times of difficulty will always be in place but the greatest should be on friends and family, the community and places of worship to give the helping hand. That approach creates a warmer, friendlier, more loving approach to living than a system where in the hardest of times you are merely a number.

For frustrated Democrats and minorities if ever there was a time to be bold and step out of the box of conventional thinking it is now. In Virginia voting Republican will ensure the Constitutional amendments to protect privacy and property rights, educational choice and world class standards, and most of all jobs and prosperity. Governor McDonnell did not wait for over two years to start talking jobs. Immediately upon taking office he took steps that moved the state from 35th to third place in job creation and one of the best places to do business. That is a trend that needs to continue.

We all have the power to ask our representatives to listen to our concerns and properly represent us. If they do not we can limit their employment. Give the guys that have most been most associated with prosperity, family and solid values the chance to take Virginia in a strong positive direction. We know what to do if they do not deliver. Please do not stay at home or allow anyone who has to power to vote to do so on Tuesday, November 8. Visit websites to learn more. Vote for better, vote for empowerment and the promise of being American, vote to maintain rights and property, vote for prosperity, but vote.

I Am Running The Army Ten Miler This Weekend

Friends:

I am excited to run the Army Ten Miler this weekend. For the second year in a row, I will be running with the No Greater Sacrifice Endurance Team to raise funds to support the education of the children of wounded and fallen soldiers. My good buddy Tim Nank, who sits on the NGS Board of Directors and serves in the Navy, introduced me to this organization and I have been involved ever since. Last year, I ran the Marine Corps 10K to support NGS and finished in 59:06. This year, I will run the Army Ten Miler and I plan to run the marquee event, the Marine Corps Marathon, next year.

I have been swamped with work so raising funds to run the Army Ten Miler on behalf of No Greater Sacrifice did not occur to me until now! I am asking you to please visit this site and donate whatever you can to my efforts on behalf of NGS. My goal is $500 and the suggested contribution is $50.

http://www.active.com/donate/nogreatersacrifice/PhilTran

No, I have not been training for the Army Ten Miler! When I was in college, I ran a university-sponsored half-marathon in support of scholarships for Baylor University. I was an understatedly cocky individual and thought I could run a half-marathon riding solely on my college football training. I did squats (I max at 405 pounds.) the day before I ran during football offseason workouts. I finished the half-marathon second to last at 2 hours 36 minutes, but I finished!

I do intend to finish the Army Ten Miler with no training whatsoever. It is not the ideal situation, but I just need to get my mind right and get on beast mode for 2 hours this weekend. Once again, please donate to help support the education of the children of our wounded and fallen American heroes. Thank you!

http://www.active.com/donate/nogreatersacrifice/PhilTran

– Phil Tran

Labor Day Thoughts

http://www2.baylor.edu/baylorproud/2011/09/baylor-pride-swells-following-epic-football-win-over-14-tcu-in-front-of-national-audience/

http://scores.espn.go.com/ncf/recap?gameId=312450239

It is Labor Day weekend. That means one thing. No, it does not mean that political campaigns begin the sprint to Election Day, although that is true for politicos. For most normal folks, including me (as politically involved as I am, I am shockingly normal), it means the start of the football season. Labor Day weekend marks the traditional beginning of the high school, college, and, until about ten seasons ago, NFL football. (The NFL moved its first weekend of games to the weekend after Labor Day for marketing and revenue purposes.)

As my friend and client Brian Schoeneman can attest firsthand, when it comes to football, I am very stoic. I watch the game from a cerebral vantage point in dead silence (this is where I am no longer normal!), even when an epic battle is on display with one of my favorite players involved. I’ve been watching the game like this since I was a little kid. As a player, I never was much of a vocal person on the field. It is not my style and it takes too much energy to yell. I celebrate with my body language, but I don’t whoop and holler. I just quietly wreck. It is business.

This fact may be looked down upon by my friends from strictly academic schools*, but the reality is that in many parts of the United States, especially way down south where I grew up, the value of a person’s college degree is directly correlated with the strength and prestige of the respective football program. (* Fact: The Ivy League is nothing more than an athletic conference that happens to include some of the best schools in the world.) People who have no ability to play football apply to schools with strong football programs because the performance of the football team affects the college experience. Football fans display unparalleled dedication to their team and a spring intra-squad game (team playing itself) can attract 90,000+ fans.

It is what it is. I have a love/hate relationship with the “football is religion” attitude. On one hand, I deeply appreciate the unbridled spirit and passion that unites a community through good times and bad times and attracts nearly 100,000 people to watch what is essentially, spring practice. On the other hand, I am amused by the obsession and vicarious living of the fans through their football team.

Alumni from other schools who want to talk smack and banter with me about college football will realize that I don’t reciprocate. A candidate for public office tried doing this with me on first impression once. He came off to me as behaving quite impolitely. I do not live my life vicariously through others. The success of my alma mater’s sports programs do not affect my self esteem, perceived value of my degree and affiliations, or my inherent pride in my school for the experiences I had and the lessons I have learned.

Regardless of how well the football team currently performs, I will always be proud to be a Baylor football letterman and graduate.

When my alma mater defeated #14 TCU Friday night in epic fashion, I was certainly pleased, but I showed little outward enthusiasm. For all of Baylor Nation, it was a monumental accomplishment of great magnitude. It was a statement to Texas, Texas A&M, Oklahoma, and others of that ilk that Baylor is no longer a whipping post. Alumni can now show up to work the next week and talk smack to alumni of other schools. Alumni will get congratulatory remarks from others as if they actually played on the team, even though the vast majority of them never suited up to play ball for the school.

Baylor’s victory does not come as a surprise to me. I know firsthand the enormous sacrifices college athletes make to play their sport at the highest level. I expect Baylor to be mentioned in the same sentence with LSU, Florida, and other perennial contenders for the National Championship. I expect to win. I expect greatness. That is the standard.

There is a world of policy surrounding high school, collegiate, and professional sports that I hope to expound on in future articles. Some may view athletics as an intellectually inferior pursuit, but the reality is that sports business is big business in America and across the world. Sports affect a wide gamut of public policy including jobs, education, social justice, and even foreign affairs.

Everything I do in politics, I first learned on the gridiron and in the front office. I spent a rewarding year working in the front office of the Baylor Athletic Department during graduate school several years ago where we pioneered much of the new media and community outreach strategies elected officials and candidates are employing today with great success. Want to be a quality political and legislative staffer? Work in sports first!

In summation,

– Expect to win in everything you do.
– Do not give in to the “soft bigotry of low expectations”. It hurts the individual as much as it hurts a sports team.
– Articles by me analyzing the world where sports and public policy intersect are on the docket.

Finally…

Sic ‘em Bears.

Reflections on Father’s Day

Today was my first’s Father’s Day as a father, and between enjoying time with my son and my wife (recently returned from a business trip), I paused a moment to reflect on how much has changed in the last year.

A year ago this June, I was celebrating my first wedding anniversary and beginning yet another summer of law school classes.  KayAnn was eight months pregnant and we were definitely in nesting mode.  My pre-father’s day gift (along with my anniversary and birthday present) was an iPad.  I was still running my small business, which was stressful, but did allow me the flexibility to help KayAnn out around the house when she was on bed rest at the end.  Common Sense was an infant too – just a few weeks old and I was still wondering if starting my own blog was a good idea.

Fast forwarding to today, things are much different, and it’s amazing the difference a single year can make in someone’s life.  I’ve got a new job, wound up the small business, and graduated law school magna cum laude – a feat I didn’t expect when I started school, considering I was working full time and knew I wouldn’t have the kind of time to put into studying that my colleagues had.  The iPad has been attached to me pretty much all the time, Common Sense is one of the top conservative blogs in Virginia and I’m the Republican nominee for House of Delegates in the 37th House District.  But what’s most important is that I’m the father to the cutest kid I’ve ever seen. Nick and I had a lot of fun over the last week together and I look forward to many more Father’s Days in the future.

He got me an Orioles tie, which proves that I’ve been raising him right.

It’s very easy for all of us to get caught up in the drama and nonsense that are fundamental to daily life.  And for those of us in politics, it’s easy to lose sight of the things that matter.  In the whirlwind of door knocking, speeches, fundraising, events, meetings and parades, it can be hard to prioritize and to put things in their proper perspective.

As I say in my stump speech, I’ve worn a lot of hats, but the three I’m proudest of are father, a husband. and Virginian.

Today is one of those days that reminds me that no matter what things I do in life to put bread on the table, no matter what titles or offices I may hold, and even if I have the honor of representing the 37th House District in the oldest legislative body in the western hemisphere, the most important job I’ll ever have is being a Dad.

Happy Father’s Day everybody!

Happy Flag Day!

Resolved, That the flag of the United States be made of thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new Constellation.

Flag Act of 1777, Second Continental Congress, June 14, 1777

President Woodrow Wilson issued a proclamation naming June 14 Flag Day. On August 3, 1949, President Harry Truman signed a resolution passed by Congress that officially created June 14 as National Flag Day.

It’s easy to forget Flag Day in the hustle and bustle of the summer.  But with the weather being so great, I hope many of you will get a chance to go outside and see the Stars and Stripes flying in your neighborhoods.  No matter which side of the aisle we are on, no matter what our views are on a particular issue, we are all Americans and our flag is a symbol of that unity.

Happy Flag Day from Common Sense!